Crime/Justice
Justice
 
 
 

 

argaiv1066

* The Evolution of Policing: Worldwide Innovations and Insights. Edited by Melchor de Guzman (State U of New York, Brockport), Mintie Das and Dilip K. Das (International Police Executive Symposium, Guilderland, New York). CRC Press (dist by Routledge), Nov 2013, 497p, $119.95hb (www.crcpress.com/9781466567153 ). The internationalization of community policing and emergence of democratizing states have highlighted the importance of finding the best model of policing philosophies and practices. Each year, the International Police Executive Symposium (IPES) holds a global conference for police scholars and practitioners to exchange information about the latest trends in police practice and research. Drawn from recent proceedings, the volume cover topics such as trends in evolving police roles among democratic and democratizing states in pursuit of improved policing models; impact and implementation of the currently dominant philosophy of community-oriented policing; innovations in police training and personnel management; police operations and issues relating to ethics, technology, investigations, and public relations; and challenges to police practices such as terrorism, decentralization, and the policing of indigenous and special population groups. (POLICING INNOVATIONS WORLDWIDE * CRIME)

 

* Reducing Gun Violence in America: Informing Policy with Evidence and Analysis. Edited by Daniel W. Webster and Jon S. Vernack (both Bloomberg School of Public Health and co-directors JHU Center for Gun Policy and Research). Foreword by Michael R. Bloomberg (Mayor, NYC). Baltimore MD: Johns Hopkins U Press, Jan 2014, 320p, $9.95 (also as e-book). Gun violence claims 31,000 US lives each year, and the rate of firearms homicides is 20 times higher than in other economically advanced nations. It is an urgent public health issue demanding an effective, evidence-based policy response. JHU convened some 20 of the world’s leading experts on gun violence and policy to summarize relevant research and recommend policies that are both constitutional and have broad public support—policies that are supported by the majority of Americans, including gun owners. The most contentious gun policy reform is the regulation of firearm sales and stopping the diversion of guns to criminals. [ALSO SEE two selections from this 320-page book in e-book format: Regulating Gun Sales by Daniel W. Webster et al. (JHUP, March 2014, 32p, $0.99) and The Second Amendment by Lawrence Rosenthal and Adam Winkler (JHUP, March 2014, 32p, $0.99), on the constitutional right to bear arms. If these appeals to reason aren’t convincing, check out The Future of the Gun by Frank Miniter of NRA’s American Hunter magazine (Regnery Publishing, Aug 2014, 256p, $27.95), who describes “amazing breakthroughs waiting to happen in gun technology,” e.g.: new gun trigger designs to make rifles much more accurate, controlled-expansion bullets to perform through bone and cinderblocks, integrated electronic optics systems imbedded in firearms, and a new sniper rifle with computer numerical control systems. “However, the radical anti-gun lobby stands between innovation and the American people…gun grabbers threaten to stop progress in its tracks.” (publisher information).] (CRIME * GUN VIOLENCE IN U.S. * FIREARM REGULATION * GUN TECHNOLOGY)

 

* Following the Proceeds of Environmental Crime: Fish, Forests and Filthy Lucre. Edited by Gregory Rose (U of Wollongong, Australia). NY: Routledge, June 2014, 256p, $135 (www.routledge.com/9780415532396 ). Significant volumes of natural resources are illegally harvested and their proceeds laundered in the Asia-Pacific region, fostering corruption and undermining environmental governance. Looks at ways to tackle illegal fishing and logging in the region by the use of cooperative legal measures, particularly anti-money laundering and confiscation of proceeds techniques. Themes include: the nature of transnational environmental crime; patterns in laundering of illicit fish and forest products; networks for distribution of illicit products; weaknesses in current systems for assurance of the legality of products; and international legal cooperation to enforce anti-money laundering laws in relation to illicit products. (ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME * FORESTS * FISHERIES)

 

* Crime and Justice in America: 1975–2025 (Crime and Justice, Volume 42).  Edited by Michael Tonry (Director, Institute on Crime and Public Policy and Prof in Criminal Law, U of Minnesota).  U of  Chicago Press, Oct 2013, 400p, $90 (also as e-book).  Offender rehabilitation and individualized sentencing fell from favor in the American criminal system in 1975, as the partisan politics of “law and order” took over. Among the results four decades later are the world’s harshest punishments and highest imprisonment rate.  Policymaker interest in what science could tell them plummeted, just when scientific work on crime, recidivism, and the justice system began to blossom. Some policy areas—sentencing, gun violence, drugs, youth violence—became “evidence-free zones.”  Evidence did matter in other areas, such as developmental crime prevention, policing, and recidivism studies.  (CRIME AND SCIENCE * CRIME AND JUSTICE)

 

* Environmental Crime and Corruption in Russia (Transnational Crime and Corruption Series). Edited by Sally Stoecker and Ramziya Shakirova (both, George Mason U, Virginia). NY: Routledge, July 2013, 224p, $155 (www.routledge.com/9780415698702). Presents a wide-ranging assessment of the environmental problems faced by Russia, and of the crime and corruption which contribute to them. The attitude of the Russian government seems to view environmental protection as something for rich countries, or something to be postponed until Russia is on the same economic footing as wealthier Scandinavian and western European countries. Concludes, gloomily, that the problems are getting worse and that little is being done to tackle them. (ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME * RUSSIA)
* Routledge Handbook of Political Corruption. Edited by Paul Heywood (Prof of Politics, U of Nottingham). NY: Routledge, July 2013, 368p, $205 (www.routledge.com/9780415617789 ). Since the early 1990s, a series of major scandals in both the financial and political worlds has resulted in close attention to the issue of corruption. Although concerted international attention began to be devoted to the issue following the end of the Cold War, “corruption remains widespread today, possibly even more so (than before).” This Handbook describes the most innovative research in the field of corruption. (CORRUPTION * CRIME * FINANCIAL CORRUPTION)

* Environmental Crime and Corruption in Russia (Transnational Crime and Corruption Series). Edited by Sally Stoecker and Ramziya Shakirova (both, George Mason U, Virginia). NY: Routledge, July 2013, 224p, $155 (www.routledge.com/9780415698702). Presents a wide-ranging assessment of the environmental problems faced by Russia, and of the crime and corruption which contribute to them. The attitude of the Russian government seems to view environmental protection as something for rich countries, or something to be postponed until Russia is on the same economic footing as wealthier Scandinavian and western European countries. Concludes, gloomily, that the problems are getting worse and that little is being done to tackle them. (ENVIRONMENTAL CRIME * RUSSIA)

 

* Routledge Handbook of Political Corruption. Edited by Paul Heywood (Prof of Politics, U of Nottingham). NY: Routledge, July 2013, 368p, $205 (www.routledge.com/9780415617789 ). Since the early 1990s, a series of major scandals in both the financial and political worlds has resulted in close attention to the issue of corruption. Although concerted international attention began to be devoted to the issue following the end of the Cold War, “corruption remains widespread today, possibly even more so (than before).” This Handbook describes the most innovative research in the field of corruption. (CORRUPTION * CRIME * FINANCIAL CORRUPTION)

* Lone Wolf Terrorism: Understanding the Growing Threat.  Jeffrey D. Simon (Political Risk Assessment Co.; Visiting Lecturer in Pol Sci, UCLA; www.futureterrorism.com).  Foreword by Brian Michael Jenkins (RAND).  Amherst NY: Prometheus Books, Feb 2013, 335 p, $26.  Former CIA director Leon Panetta told Congress in 2010 that the lone wolf terrorist is “the main threat” to the US.  This threat is increasingly occurring in rich and poor countries worldwide, and “is destined to grow in the coming years,” enabled by advances in technology, particularly the Internet, which offers information on tactics, targets, and weapons.  Lone wolves do not have to consider whether their ends justify the means, since they are beholden to nobody, and often think “out of the box.”  Five basic but overlapping types: the secular lone wolf (attacks for political causes), the religious lone wolf (Islamic extremists and white supremacists have been most active recently), the single-issue lone wolf (e.g. anti-abortion, animal rights, the environment), the criminal lone wolf (seeking financial gain), and the ideosyncratic lone wolf (with severe psychological problems).  Strategies for prevention include improved detection devices, more closed circuit TV in public areas, biometrics, monitoring lone wolf use of the Internet, and increasing public awareness.  Lessons learned: lone wolves are not as crazy as many assume, al Qaeda and Islamic militancy has inspired lone wolf attacks but many other attackers are motivated for different reasons, be skeptical of statistics, and do not underestimate the creativity and danger of the lone wolf. (TERRORISM * SECURITY * CRIME/JUSTICE)

 

* Prosecutors and Politics: A Comparative Perspective.  Crime and Justice, Volume 41.   Edited by Michael Tonry (director, Institute on Crime and Public Policy; Chair in Law and Public Policy, U of Minnesota).  Chicago IL: U of Chicago Press, Oct 2012, 400p, $90 (also as e-book).  In any criminal justice system, prosecutors decide what crimes to prosecute, whom to pursue, what charges to file, whether to plea bargain, how aggressively to seek a conviction, and what sentence to demand.  In the US, citizens can challenge decisions by police, judges, and corrections officials, but courts keep their hands off the prosecutor. The authors examine prosecutors’ public role and critically compare how prosecutors function in different legal systems, from state to state or across countries.  While police, courts, and prisons are much the same in all developed countries, prosecutors differ radically. Consequently, the US suffers from low levels of public confidence in the criminal justice system and high levels of incarceration; in much of Western Europe, people report high confidence and support moderate crime control policies; in much of Eastern Europe, people’s perceptions of the law are marked by cynicism and despair.  (CRIME/JUSTICE * PROSECUTORS AND JUSTICE)

 

* Virtual Economies and Financial Crime: Money Laundering in Cyberspace. Clare Chambers-Jones (U of the West of England, UK and Commonwealth Legal Education Assn). Northampton MA: Edward Elgar, June 2012, 208p, $125.  Virtual economies and financial crime are increasingly significant facets to banking, finance, and anti-money laundering regulations on an international scale. Examines the jurisprudential elements of cyber law in the context of virtual economic crime and explains how the latter can take place in virtual worlds. Highlights the loopholes criminals use to launder money due to lack of jurisdictional consensus on detection and prosecution. (CRIME/JUSTICE * MONEY LAUNDERING IN CYBERSPACE * VIRTUAL FINANCIAL CRIME)

 

* Money Laundering in the Real Estate Sector: Suspicious Properties. Brigitte Unger and Joras Ferwerda (Utrecht U School of Economics, Netherlands). Northampton MA: Edward Elgar, 2011, 192p, $110 (on-line price $99). In many countries, the real estate sector is vulnerable to money laundering due the high value of assets, price fluctuations and speculation within the market, difficulties in assessing the true value of a house, and the fact that the legal owner is not necessarily the economic owner. Shows how to detect criminal investment in the real estate sector by identifying 25 characteristics which render a property susceptible to money laundering; the more such characteristics a property exhibits, the more suspicious it becomes. (ECONOMY * CRIME/JUSTICE * REAL ESTATE * MONEY LAUNDERING)

 

* Prosecutors and Politics: A Comparative Perspective.  Crime and Justice, Volume 41.  Edited by Michael Tonry (director, Institute on Crime and Public Policy; Chair in Law and Public Policy, U of Minnesota).  Chicago IL: U of Chicago Press, Oct 2012, 400p, $90 (also as e-book).  In any criminal justice system, prosecutors decide what crimes to prosecute, whom to pursue, what charges to file, whether to plea bargain, how aggressively to seek a conviction, and what sentence to demand.  In the US, citizens can challenge decisions by police, judges, and corrections officials, but courts keep their hands off the prosecutor. The authors examine prosecutors’ public role and critically compare how prosecutors function in different legal systems, from state to state or across countries.  While police, courts, and prisons are much the same in all developed countries, prosecutors differ radically. Consequently, the US suffers from low levels of public confidence in the criminal justice system and high levels of incarceration; in much of Western Europe, people report high confidence and support moderate crime control policies; in much of Eastern Europe, people’s perceptions of the law are marked by cynicism and despair. (CRIME/JUSTICE * PROSECUTORS AND JUSTICE)
 
* The Behavioral Foundations of Public Policy. Edited by Eldar Shafir (Prof of Psychology and Public Affairs, Princeton U).  Princeton NJ: Princeton U Press, Jan 2013, 528p, $55. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made in behavioral research on a wide variety of topics, e.g.: behavioral finance, labor contracts, philanthropy, savings and poverty, eyewitness identification, sentencing decisions, racism, sexism, health behaviors, and voting. Research findings have often been strikingly counterintuitive.  Experts in psychology, decision research, policy analysis, economics, political science, law, medicine, and philosophy explore major trends, principles, and general insights about human behavior in policy-relevant settings and provide a deeper understanding of the many drivers—cognitive, social, perceptual, motivational, and emotional—that guide behaviors in everyday settings. Wide-ranging investigation into people’s motivations, abilities, attitudes, and perceptions finds that they differ in profound ways from what is typically assumed. The result is that public policy acquires even greater significance, since, rather than merely facilitating the conduct of human affairs, policy actually shapes their trajectory. (GOVERNMENT * PUBLIC POLICY AND BEHAVIORAL RESEARCH * CRIME/JUSTICE)
 
* Who Are the Criminals? The Politics of Crime Policy from the Age of Roosevelt to the Age of Reagan. John Hagan (Prof of Sociology and Law, Northwestern U; codirector, Center on Law and Globalization, American Bar Foundation). Princeton NJ: Princeton U Press, 2010; Sept 2012 edition with a new afterword, 336p, $22.95pb. The recent history of American criminal justice can be divided into two eras—the age of Roosevelt (roughly 1933 to 1973) and the age of Reagan (1974 to 2008). The first era focused on rehabilitation and corporate regulation. The second aimed for harsh treatment of street crimes, which disproportionately affected minorities and the poor. At the same time, deregulation of business provided new opportunities and incentives for white-collar crime—and helped cause the 2008 financial crisis. In a new afterword, Hagan assesses Obama’s policies regarding punishment of white-collar and street crimes, and debates whether there is any evidence of a significant change in the way our country punishes them. (CRIME/JUSTICE * WHITE-COLLAR CRIME * ECONOMIC CRISIS)
 
Boilerplate: The Fine Print, Vanishing Rights, and the Rule of Law. Margaret Jane Radin (Prof of Law, U of Michigan; Prof of Law emerita, Stanford U).  Princeton NJ: Princeton U Press, Dec 2012, 240p, $35.  Boilerplate—the fine-print terms and conditions that we become subject to when we click “I agree” online, rent an apartment, enter an employment contract, sign up for a cellphone carrier, or buy travel tickets—pervades all aspects of modern lives. Use of boilerplate provisions has degraded traditional notions of consent, agreement, and contract, and sacrificed core rights whose loss threatens the democratic order. Some claim either that recipients freely consent to them or that economic efficiency demands them. Radin argues that our courts, legislatures, and regulatory agencies have fallen short in their evaluation and oversight of the use of boilerplate clauses.       (LAW * BOILERPLATE * CONTRACTS: FINE PRINT)

* Toward a Unified Criminology: Integrating Assumptions about Crime, People, and Society. Robert Agnew (Prof of Sociology, Emory U). NY: NYU Press, Nov 2011, 272p, $28pb. Why do people commit crimes? How do we control crime? The theories that criminologists use to answer these questions are built on a number of underlying assumptions about the nature of crime, free will, human nature, and society. They largely determine what criminologists study, the causes they examine, the control strategies they recommend, and how they test their theories and evaluate crime-control strategies. Makes the case that these assumptions are too restrictive (unduly limiting the types of “crime” that are explored, the causes that are considered, and the methods of data collection and analysis that are employed) and they undermine our ability to explain and control crime. Proposes an alternative set of assumptions with the goal of laying the foundation for a unified criminology that is better able to explain a broader range of crimes. (CRIME/JUSTICE * CRIMINOLOGY: ASSUMPTIONS QUESTIONED)


*Right Wing Resurgence: How a Domestic Terrorist Threat Is Being Ignored. Daryl Johnson (Dept of Homeland Security).  Washington: Government Institutes (dist by Lanham MD: Rowman & Littlefield), Sept 2012, 432p, $35 (also as e-book).  A former senior terrorism analyst at the DHS Office of Intelligence & Analysis (2004-2010) offers a detailed account of the growth of right-wing extremism and militias in the US and the ever-increasing threat they pose. Provides insight into the DHS Rightwing Extremism report, and depicts the facts, circumstances and events leading up to the leak of this official intelligence assessment. Includes case studies and interviews with leaders, which reveal their agendas, how they recruit, and how they operate around the country. (SECURITY * CRIME * RIGHT-WING RESURGENCE IN U.S. * TERRORISM: DOMESTIC THREAT IN U.S.)

 
*Phake: The Deadly World of Falsified and Substandard MedicinesRoger Bate (Fellow in Global Prosperity, American Enterprise Institute).   Washington: AEI Press (dist. by Rowman & Littlefield), May 2012, 400p, $49.95.  Draws on many years spent on the trail of counterfeit medicines in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East to expose the anatomy of a nebulous, far-reaching black market that has resulted in countless deaths and injuries around the world.  Describes the counterfeit drug trade and offers an incisive policy analysis with important ramifications for decision makers in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the  World Health Organization.  (HEALTH * CRIME * DRUG  COUNTERFEITING * COUNTERFEIT DRUG TRADE)

 

* Thirteen Ways to Steal a Bicycle: Theft Law in the Information AgeStuart P. Green (Prof of Law and Justice, Rutgers U).  Cambridge MA: Harvard U Press, June 2012, 388p, $45 (also as e-book).  Theft claims more victims and causes greater economic injury than any other criminal offense.  Our economy increasingly commodifies intangibles and the means of committing theft become even more sophisticated.  The last major reforms in Anglophone theft law, almost 50 years ago, flattened moral distinctions, so that the same punishments are now assigned to vastly different offenses.  Fundamental questions about what should count s stealing remain unresolved in the law, especially regarding misappropriations of intellectual property, information, ideas, identities, and virtual property.  Calls for upgrading the t theft law, to favor gradations in blames according to what is stolen and under what circumstances.  (CRIME/JUSTICE *LAW IN INFORMATION AGE  * THEFT LAW OUTDATED * INFORMATION AGE THEFT LAW)
 
* In Doubt: The Psychology of the Criminal Justice ProcessDan Simon (Prof of Law and Psychology, U of Southern California).  Cambridge MA: Harvard U Press, April 2012, 420p, $45 (also as e-book).  Flawed investigations can produce erroneous evidence, and well-meaning juries send innocent people to prison and set the guilty free.  Shows how: 1) investigators draw faulty conclusions, conduct coercive interrogations, and get false confessions; 2) eye witnesses’ identification of perpetrators and detailed recollections of criminal events rely on cognitive processes that are often mistaken, and can easily be skewed by investigative procedures used; and 3) in the courtroom, jurors and judges are ill-equipped to assess the accuracy of testimony.  Recommends ways to improve the accuracy of criminal investigations and trials.  (CRIME/JUSTICE * CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS: ACCURACY)

 

* The Money Laundry: Regulating Criminal Finance in the Global EconomyJ. C. Sharman (Prof, Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith U).  Ithaca NY: Cornell U Press, Nov 2011, 224p, $ 29.95.  A generation ago not a single country had laws to counter money laundering; now, more countries have standardized anti–money laundering (AML) policies than have armed forces. Investigates whether AML policy works, and why it has spread so rapidly to so many states with so little in common; asserts that there are few benefits to such policies but high costs, which fall especially heavily on poor countries; and demonstrates that it is easier to form untraceable companies in large rich states than in small poor ones: “the United States is the worst offender.”  Despite its ineffectiveness, AML policy has spread via OECD’s Financial Action Task Force (the key standard-setter and enforcer), international banks, and the G20.(CRIME/JUSTICE * MONEY-LAUNDERING * WORLD ECONOMY * CORRUPTION)
 
 * Investing in Security:  A Global Assessment of Armed Violence Reduction InitiativesOrganisation for Economic Co-operation and Development & UN Development Programme.  Paris: OECD, Sept 2011, 81p.  Conservative estimates indicate that at least 740,000 men, women, youth and children die each year as a result of armed violence, most of them in low- and medium-income settings. The majority of these deaths occur in situations other than war, though armed conflicts continue to generate a high incidence of casualties.  Provides information on Armed Violence Reduction and Prevention interventions and their effectiveness, maps 570 AVRP initiatives around the world (indicative of thousands that are underway), highlights promising practices, and focuses on the wide range of AVRP activities in six countries – Brazil, Burundi, Colombia, Liberia, South Africa and Timor-Leste. 
(SECURITY * CRIME/JUSTICE * VIOLENCE REDUCTION INITIATIVES)
 
* Lawyer Barons: What Their Contingency Fees Really Cost AmericaLester Brickman (Prof of Law, Yeshiva U, NYC).  NY: Cambridge U Press, Jan 2011, 408p, $29.99pb.  For the wrongfully injured who cannot afford legal representation, personal injury lawyers are paid through contingency fees: a percentage of damages won in the trial.  These financial incentives for lawyers to litigate are so inordinately high that they perversely impact our justice system and impose other unconscionable costs.  Presents the intellectual architecture that underpins all tort reform efforts. 
(CRIME/JUSTICE * LAWYER FEES * TORT REFORM * PERSONAL INJURY LAWYERS)
 
* Why the Law Is So PerverseLeo Katz (Prof of Law, U of Pennsylvania).  Chicago IL: U of Chicago Press, Sept 2011, 256p, $35.  Four fundamental features of our legal system seem to not make sense on some level and demand explanation: 1) legal decisions are essentially made in an either/or fashion – guilty of not guilty, liable or not liable, either it’s a contract or it’s not – but the reality is rarely that clear-cut; 2) the law is full of loopholes that cannot be made to disappear; 3) legal systems are loath to punish certain kinds of highly immoral conduct while prosecuting other far less pernicious behaviors; 4) the law prohibits often win-win transactions, such as organ sales or surrogacy contracts.  All these perversions arise out from a cluster of logical difficulties related to multi-criteria decision-making, and illustrate why they resist any easy resolution.             (CRIME/JUSTICE * LAWS: WHY THEY ARE PERVERSE)
 
* Controlling Crime: Strategies and Tradeoffs.  Edited by Philip J. Cook (Prof of Public Policy, Duke U), Jens Ludwig (Prof of Public Admin, U of Chicago; Director, U of Chicago Crime Lab), and Justin McCrary (Prof of Law, U of California-Berkeley).  National Bureau of Economic Research (dist by U of Chicago Press), Oct 2011, 720p, $110.  Criminal justice expenditures have more than doubled since the 1980s.  With state and local revenue shortfalls, the question of whether crime control can be accomplished with fewer resources or by investing those resources in areas other than the criminal justice system is all the more relevant.  Considers alternative ways to reduce crime that do not sacrifice public safety, and looks specifically at criminal justice system reform, social policy, and government policies affecting alcohol abuse, drugs, and private crime prevention. 
(CRIME/JUSTICE * CRIME CONTROL STRATEGIES)
 
** The Collapse of American Criminal JusticeWilliam J. Stuntz (deceased, 2011; Prof of Law, Harvard U).  Cambridge MA: Harvard U Press/Belknap Press, Sept 2011, 390p, $35 (also as e-book).  The rule of law has vanished in America’s criminal justice system, as prosecutors now decide whom to punish and how severely, and almost no one accused of a crime will ever face a jury.  Inconsistent policing, rampant plea bargaining, overcrowded courtrooms, and ever more draconian sentencing have produced a gigantic prison population, with black citizens the primary defendants and victims of crime.  Explains how the system has become more centralized, with state legislators and federal judges given increasing powers.  The liberal Warren Supreme Court’s emphasis on procedure, not equity, joined hands with conservative insistence on severe punishment to create a system that is both harsh and ineffective.  Advocates more trials with local juries, laws that accurately define what prosecutors seek to punish, and an equal protection guarantee like the one that died in the 1870s, to make prosecution and punishment less discriminatory.  Criminal punishment is a necessary but terrible tool, that should be used effectively, and sparingly.   (CRIME/JUSTICE * CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN U.S.: COLLAPSE OF)
 
* Rights for Victims of Crime: Rebalancing JusticeIrvin Waller (Prof, U of Ottawa; Vice-President, International Organization for Victim Assistance).  Lanham MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2011, 232p, $32.95 (also e-book).  Advocates rights for victims of crime, in the cause of transforming an antiquated system of criminal and civil justice into a modern system that is just and fair.   Some laws support victims by providing assistance, compensation, and protection from the accused, but there is inadequate implementation.  Courts must balance rights for defenders and victims and restitution from offenders must be ordered and collected, not overlooked.  Services for women, children, and elderly victims must be adequately funded.         (CRIME/JUSTICE * VICTIMS OF CRIME * RIGHTS FOR CRIME VICTIMS)
 
** Phantom Billing, Fake Prescriptions, and the High Cost of Medicine: Health Care Fraud and What to Do About ItTerry L. Leap (Prof of Management, Clemson U).  Ithaca NY:  Cornell U Press/ILR Press, April 2011, 256p, $29.95.   US health care is a 2.5 trillion system that accounts for more than 17% of the nation’s GDP.  It is also highly susceptible to fraud.  Some observers believe that as much as 10% of medical billing involves some type of fraud.  Looks at a wide variety of crimes (kickbacks, illicit referrals, overcharging and double billing, upcoding, unbundling, rent-a-patient and pill-mill schemes, insurance scams, short-pilling, off-label marketing of pharmaceuticals, and rebate fraud), as well as criminal acts that enable this fraud (mail and wire fraud, conspiracy, and money laundering).  Suggests ways that providers, consumers, insurers, and federal and state officials can bring health care fraud and abuse under control.                     (HEALTH * CRIME/JUSTICE * HEALTH CARE FRAUD)
 
* Griftopia: Bubble Machines, Vampire Squids, and the Long Con That Is Breaking AmericaMatt Taibbi (Rolling Stone).  NY: Spiegel & Grau (Random House), Nov 2010, 262p, $26 (paper edition Aug 2011, 288p, $16pb).  The financial crisis that exploded in 2008 isn’t past, but prologue—the coming out party for the network of looters who sit at the nexus of US political and economic power.  The grafter class—the largest players in the financial industry and the politicians who do their bidding—has been growing in power for a generation, transferring wealth upward through increasingly complex financial mechanisms and political maneuvers.  Chapters describe the hidden commodities bubble that transferred billions of dollars to Wall Street while creating global food shortages, how the Tea Party is being expertly manipulated by a small group of plutocrats, Alan Greenspan as “the biggest asshole in the Universe,” the little-known story of AIG’s securities-lending operation, infrastructure privatization, the Obama health care reform bill as a craven capitulation to Big Insurance, the scandalous lack of federal regulation of health insurers, and Goldman Sachs as the “vampire squid wrapped around the face of humanity, relentlessly jamming its blood funnel into anything that smells like money.”  [NOTE: The style of this investigative journalism may offend some, but Taibbi may well have uncovered ugly truths that polite academics can’t or won’t imagine.]
        (ECONOMIC CRISIS * CRIME/JUSTICE * FINANCIAL INDUSTRY EXCORIATED)
 
* Drugs and Drug Policy: What Everyone Needs to KnowMark A.R. Kleiman (Prof of Public Policy, UCLA), Jonathan P. Caulkins (Prof of Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon U), and Angela Hawken (Assoc Prof of Public Policy, Pepperdine U).  NY: Oxford U Press, July 2011, 240p, $16.95pb.  While there have always been norms and customs around the use of drugs, explicit public policies - regulations, taxes, and prohibitions - designed to control drug abuse are a more recent phenomenon. Drug policy carries two side-effects: development of criminal enterprises dealing in forbidden drugs and use of the profits in drug-dealing to finance insurgency and terrorism.  The authors discuss drugs and how they work in the brain, the nature of addiction, the damage they to do users, legalization issues, the role of criminal prohibitions, the relative tolerance for alcohol and tobacco, the relationship between drugs and crime, the effectiveness of treatment, beneficial effects of some abused substances, and the relation of drugs to terrorism.  [Also see “Dare to End the War on Drugs” (The Nation Special Issue, 27 Dec 2010, 11-44), with articles on failed law enforcement programs, the legalization movement, and rebalancing drug policy to a more sensible approach that offers treatment rather than punishment.]         (DRUG POLICY)
 
* Convicting the Innocent: Where Criminal Prosecutions Go WrongBrandon L. Garrett (Prof of Law, U of Virginia).  Cambridge: Harvard U Press, April 2011, 358p, $39.95 (also as e-book).  DNA exonerations have shattered confidence in the criminal justice system by exposing how often we have convicted the innocent and let the guilty walk free. Garrett examines what went wrong in the cases of the first 250 wrongfully convicted people to be exonerated by DNA, revealing patterns of incompetence, abuse, and error.  Evidence corrupted by suggestive eyewitness procedures, coercive interrogations, unsound and unreliable forensics, shoddy investigations, cognitive bias, and poor lawyering illustrate the weaknesses built into our current criminal justice system.  Proposes practical reforms that rely more on documented, recorded, and audited evidence, and less on fallible human memory.                      
(CRIME/JUSTICE * CRIMINAL PROSECUTIONS QUESTIONED)
 
* Who Are the Criminals? The Politics of Crime Policy from the Age of Roosevelt to the Age of Reagan.  John Hagan (Prof of Sociology and Law, Northwestern U).  Princeton NJ: Princeton U Press, Nov 2010, 280p, $29.95.  The politicization of crime in the 20th century transformed and distorted crime policymaking and led Americans to fear street crime too much and corporate crime too little.  The Age of Roosevelt (1933-1973) focused on rehabilitation, corporate regulation, and social roots of crime; it was reversed by the Age of Reagan (1974-2008) that pursued harsh treatment of street crime, especially drug offenses, which disproportionately affect minorities and the poor and resulted in wholesale imprisonment.   At the same time, “massive deregulation of the business provided new opportunities, incentives, and reasons for white-collar crime--and helped cause the 2008 financial crisis.” 
(CRIME * ECONOMIC CRISIS * WHITE-COLLAR CRIME) 
 
** Dark Logic: Transnational Criminal Tactics and Global SecurityRobert Mandel (Prof of Intl Affairs, Lewis & Clark College, Portland OR).  Palo Alto CA: Stanford U Press, Dec 2010/280p/$24.95pb.  Transnational non-state forces (flows of people, goods, and services moving readily across borders) have been a major source of global instability.  Transnational organized crime, multifaceted and intertwined with the fabric of society, undermines the total security of countries (in its economic, cultural and political dimensions) and presents a global security challenge of huge proportions.  Examines in depth when and how transnational organized crime is likely to use corruption and violence, when and how these activities most affect the individual and the state, and when and how the consequences can be successfully combated.                          (CRIME/JUSTICE * SECURITY * ORGANIZED CRIME)
 
* Punishing Race: A Continuing American DilemmaMichael Tonry (Prof of Law and Public Policy, U of Minnesota).  NY: Oxford UP, Feb 2011/208p/$24.95.  A leading criminologist notes that one-third of young black men are controlled by the justice system and black men are seven times likelier than whites to be in prison.  These patterns result from crime and drug control policies that disproportionately affect black Americans.  The criminal justice system is simply the latest in a series of devices that maintain white dominance over blacks.   Pushes for changes in racial profiling and sentencing to reduce their huge human and social costs.       (CRIME/JUSTICE * SOCIETY: RACE * RACIAL PROFILING)
 
* Crime and the Global Political Economy.  Edited by H. Richard Friman (Prof of Pol Sci, Marquette U).  Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2009, 215p, $55.   Crime is an integral part of globalization, rather than its underside: both societal and state actors pursue selective criminalization and embrace diverse patterns of compliance with prohibition regimes. Chapters focus on the internationalization of crime control, crime and sovereignty of the offshore world, illicit commerce in peripheral states, human trafficking, immigration and organized crime, Mexican drug trafficking, and global finance in the war of terror.                                   (WORLD ECONOMY AND CRIME * CRIME AND WORLD ECONOMY)
 
* International White Collar Crime: Cases and Materials. Bruce Zagaris (partner, Berliner, Corcoran & Rowe, Washington; former Prof of Law, American U). NY: Cambridge U Press, March 2010, 366p, $45pb. On the rise of transnational  economic crime —money laundering, terrorism, corruption, and organized crime— and recent strategies in the US, UN, World Bank, INTERPOL, and economic integration groups to combat it. As transnational criminals use globalization, trade liberalization, and new technologies for criminal purposes, combating transnational business crime draws attention to arduous tasks of extraterritorial jurisdiction, evidence gathering, extradition, and international prisoner transfer.
(INTERNATIONAL LAW * U.S. FOREIGN POLICY * WHITE COLLAR CRIME GLOBALIZED)
 
* Handbook of Research on Technoethics (2 volumes).  Rocci Luppicini and Rebecca Adell (U of Ottawa, Canada).  Hershey PA: IGI Global, 2009/1,082p/$495 (perpetual access $745).  The 44 contributions by experts from 21 countries cover such topics as the anthropological approach to technoethics, artificial moral agency, biomedical research, cyber identity theft, deception in cyberspace, trends in technoethics, genetic confidentiality, global communication online ethics, human sport enhancement ethics, information ethics education, information poverty ethics, intercultural information ethics, predictive genetic testing, and software piracy.  Also see Encyclopedia of Information Ethics and Security by Marian Quigley of Monash U (IGI Global, 2007/696p).
(ETHICS AND TECHNOLOGY * TECHNOETHICS * CRIME)
 
** Corruption, Global Security, and World Order.   Edited by Robert I. Rotberg (Harvard U; president, World Peace Foundation). Brookings Institution Press, Aug 2009/375p/$32.95pb. Corruption—an ancient phenomenon—today threatens global security; essays explore ties between corrupt practices and threats to global peace, threats to human rights and development, maintenance of tyranny, how criminals and criminalized states now control many areas of the world, corruption in health and education, and remedies such as positive leadership, enhanced transparency, new sanctions, and tougher punishment.                                                   (SECURITY * WORLD ORDER * CORRUPTION)
 
** Cruel and Unusual: The Culture of Punishment in America. Anne-Marie Cusac (Asst Prof of Communication, Roosevelt U). Yale U Press, March 2009/320p/$27.50. Since 1973, the US imprisonment rate has multiplied over five times to become the highest in the world, with >2 million inmates in state and federal prisons. In the nation’s early days, Americans repudiated Old World cruelty toward criminals and emphasized rehabilitation; this attitude persisted for some 200 years, but in recent decades we have abandoned it for a dramatic rise in use of torture and restraint, corporal and capital punishment, and punitive physical pain. America now punishes harder and longer, and with methods once rejected as cruel and unusual.                       (CRIME/JUSTICE * PUNISHMENT TRENDS IN U.S.)
 
** When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment. Mark A.R. Kleiman (Prof of Public Policy, UCLA). Princeton UP, Oct 2009/256p/$29.95. Since the crime explosion of the 1960s, the US prison population has multiplied fivefold and is unmatched anywhere in the world, but locking up more people for longer terms is no longer a workable strategy; explains how we can get of the trap within a decade by cutting both crime and the prison population in half.     (CRIME * U.S. PRISONS)
 
* American Penology: A History of Control (Enlarged Second Edition). Thomas G. Blomberg (Dean, School of Criminology, Florida State U) and Karol Lucken (Prof of Criminal Justice, U of Central Florida). Aldine Transaction, Jan 2010/340p/$29.95pb. On the past, present, and likely future of punishment, beginning with colonial America in the 1600s, using history to help explain various punishment ideas and practices; also discusses the consequences of various reforms, the larger culture of control, and declining levels of democracy, freedom, and privacy.                          (CRIME * PUNISHMENT IN U.S.)
 
* Combating Piracy: Intellectual Property Theft and Fraud. Edited by Jay S. Albanese (Prof of Public Policy, Virginia Commonwealth U). Transaction Publishers, Aug 2009/191p/$24.95pb. First published in Jan 2007 (180p), contributors discuss how fraud and piracy of products and ideas have become common in the 21C, as opportunities to commit them expand and technology makes it easier. Cases described here illustrate the wide-ranging nature of the activity (a form of organized crime and white-collar crime), the spectrum of persons involved, and the need for international remedies.
(CRIME * INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY THEFT * FRAUD AND PIRACY INCREASING)
 
* Anticorruption in the Health Sector: Strategies for Transparency and Accountability. Edited by Taryn Vian (Boston U), William Savedoff, and Harald Mathisen. Kumarian Press, April 2010/208p/$21.95pb. Corruption is a serious problem for both rich and poor countries, threatening international development and eroding confidence in government. In the health sector, it involves fake drugs, corrupt regulators, doctors extorting extra payments from patients, and embezzled repair funds for facilities. Case studies show best practices from Africa, Central Europe, and South America.
(CRIME * CORRUPTION: HEALTH SECTOR * HEALTH SERVICES AND CORRUPTION)
 
* Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who Are Bringing Down the Internet. Joseph Menn (Financial Times; formerly Los Angeles Times). NY: Public Affairs, Feb 2010/288p/$25.95. On the evolution of cybercrime from small-time thieving to sophisticated, organized gangs who attack corporate websites and increasingly steal financial data from consumers and defense secrets from governments. Shows how the Russian cyber-mob and La Cosa Nostra fight over the Internet’s massive spoils, why cybercrime is much worse than thought, and why the Internet might not survive.
(CRIME * CYBERCRIME * INTERNET AND CRIME)
 
* Shooting Up: Counterinsurgency and the War on Drugs. Vanda Felbab-Brown (Brookings Fellow in Foreign Policy). Brookings Institution Press, Nov 2009/260p/$28.95. Conventional wisdom on the drug wars is “dangerously wrongheaded”: counternarcotics campaigns focused on eradication fail to bankrupt groups that rely on the drug trade and increase legitimacy of insurgents; in contrast, a laissez-faire policy toward illicit crops combined with interdiction targeted at major traffickers improves the chance of winning the war on drugs and the war against insurgents such as the Taliban.
 (DRUG WARS * SECURITY)
 
* Rogue Economics: Capitalism’s New Reality. Loretta Napoleoni (London and Montana). NY: Seven Stories Press, July 2009/320p/$16.95pb. Updated edition with a new preface and a new chapter on the global economic crisis; describes China’s fake goods, Eastern Europe’s booming sex trade, America’s subprime mortgage scandal, celebrity philanthropy in Africa, biopirates trolling the blood industry, fish-farming bandits ravaging the high seas, and games like World spawning online sweatshops.
(CRIME * GLOBAL CRIME)
 
* Crime and the Global Political Economy. Edited by H. Richard Friman (Prof of Pol Sci, Marquette U). Boulder CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers, May 2009/c.200p/$55. State and societal actors are challenged by—and complicit in—the expansion of criminal activities on a global scale; essays consider the internationalization of crime control, externalizing the costs of prohibition, financial crime and governance, immigrants and organized crime, selective criminalization, diverse patterns of compliance, and crime and the future political economy.                                        (WORLD ECONOMY * CRIME)
 
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